About D. Posnett MD

Emeritus Prof. of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College

Climate Change: Youth Activists

Youth climate activist movement in the USA: Greta Thunberg’s reach is vast. Check out Greta’s story here.

The youth shall inherit the earth…and they plan to take care of it. The growing youth activist movement has continued to expand across the world, and politicians are taking notice.

Coming up in EAST HAMPTON, NY, is this event:

https://www.guildhall.org/events/hamptons-institute/

  • Talk
  • Monday, August 5 7PM $25-$55 ($23-$50 Members) per evening for panel only | Special Tickets $500 per evening includes premium seating and post-performance reception with panelists

Eligible for Student Rush Tickets

Purchase tickets at the Box Office; 631-324-4050; or Theatermania.com at 1-866-811-4111 158 Main Street
East Hampton, NY 11937 United States Buy Tickets

Produced by Tracy Marshall and Sheraton Kalouria

Panelists:
Dr. Michael Mann, Director of the Earth System Science Center, Penn State University
Alexandria Villasenor, a Co-founder of US Youth Climate Strike and founder of Earth Uprising
Gordian Raacke, Executive Director of Renewable Energy Long Island

Our panel will address the latest science and focus on the young people around the globe that are taking action and impacting change.

Warmer Air, Heavier Rain, More Flooding

David Leonhardt writes in the NY Times about flooding in Grafton, Ill., a small town along the Mississippi River. Because of a bridge closure, the only other way for the vil­lage’s 1,000-plus res­i­dents is to the north via tens of miles of wind­ing, poorly paved coun­try roads that are barely wide enough to al­low a ve­hi­cle go­ing in each di­rec­tion,” The Wall Street Journal’s Erin Ailworth wrote recently. “A 20-minute drive to a gro­cery store now takes a few hours…”

It rained “heavily” all day long in East Hampton NY, on Thursday June 13th. One inch of rainfall according to https://www.localconditions.com/weather-east-hampton-new-york/11937/past.php The winds were out of the NE at about 10-20 mph. Nothing unusual, right?

I decided to take a drive down Gerard Drive. It is arguably one of the most sensitive areas to flooding and East Hampton Town has just completed an expensive fortification of the road to prevent ‘noreaster’ storms from crashing over the road in to Accabonac bay.

The road was passable with large puddles. About 50% of the private drive-ways were flooded.

Then I visited the cross section of Springs Fireplace Rd. and Gardiners Avenue, just by Springs Auto (Edgar’s place). This place usually gets flooded with every storm, at least in recent memory. No surprise:

This kind of flooding was rare 30-40 years ago when I first moved to East Hampton. Perhaps only with a hurricane? Now it seems more common.

To test this I tabulated historic data going back to 2000: a) total precipitation in inches for 6 months (January to June), b) average temperatures measured daily for the same 6 months (January to June). The linear trendlines computed by Excel over the 20 year period, show a slight increase of about 1 degree in average temperature and an increase of about 1 inch of rain per 6 months. Online source of data.

Inches of rain for 6 month period (blue) and average temperature for same 6 month period (red). Measurements are from Westerly State Airport, Rhode Island, about 15 miles north of Montauk.

Warmer air carries more humidity and this leads to heavier rainfall and flooding. It is happening locally and it is a clear and present danger.

Clean energy is one major way we can fight this trend.

From Kate Mueth on June 25th after a few hours of rain fall:

Support for South Fork Wind Farm

East Hampton, NY

First there is this report “Labor, Environmental Organizations, and Long Island Residents Voice Strong Support for Critical Offshore Wind Development” released by the Sierra Club.

…and then this very poignant personal letter submitted at the PSC hearing on June 11th in East Hampton:

June 11, 2019

My name is Michael Hansen. I live in Wainscott.

Today is my wedding anniversary.

But I am here today instead… (my wife understands) because I am acutely aware that we are in a climate crisis. And it’s happening right now. It’s happening on Long Island. It’s happening in the Township of East Hampton.

1.   The docks at Shelter Island need to be raised because of a rising sea level.

2.   We are paying to shore up the infrastructure in Montauk because today’s “typical nor’easter,” is not typical at all.

But the opposition to wind power on the East End wants you to know, and they have said it many times, that they are, “for renewable energy, they are for solar power, they are for wind power… but not now, it’s too expensive, somewhere else, not in my backyard.”

We are paying for climate change right now. Our tax dollars are going to those docks in Montauk. Today.  

We are in a climate crisis and I am here today to speak for my children. My daughter is eight and my son is six.

My family has been on the East End for over three hundred years—as I am sure many of the families in this room have been—and my family and yours will continue to live here. And a wind farm, that is part of a comprehensive plan, is key to our children’s future.

A final word on Wainscott. The cable landing should be there. It will be least disruptive to East Hampton Town. And, ya know, Wainscott is tough. We can take it. We endured Suffolk County Water digging up our roads to provide us with clean water.

We can endure one lane of digging for clean energy.

Why all the fuss?

This is a cross section (a real piece) of the existing Block Island cable for their wind farm, consisting of 5 wind turbines that produce all the energy for the island with surplus energy for the state of Rhode Island. It is on my kitchen table. It measures 7 inches in diameter. It is similar to the cable that will bring energy from the South Fork Wind farm ashore.

“Carbon-free New York by 2040” is the overriding goal. Period.

If the urgency of achieving this goal is not apparent to any readers, just look at the most recent local news: “Higher tides force Shelter Island Ferry to rebuild ramps” This is a very real cost of sea level rise here on the South Fork! Check it out via Newsday.com.

And this is just the beginning.

On the other side of the issue we have loud opponents of the South Fork wind farm:

1) wealthy homeowners, with mansions on the Wainscott beach, who oppose any cable coming ashore in their vicinity, clearly a case of NIMBY

2) fishermen that have been whipped up with scare tactics.  I note that there are only 2 commercial fishing boats out of Montauk that fish in the Southfork wind farm area (OCS-A 0486, near Cox Ledge) which is closer to Rhode Island and Martha’s Vineyard than to Montauk.  From Montauk it takes 5 hours to get there by boat and 5 hours back.

For all those worried about a disruptive cable running under the sea bed and coming ashore somewhere, I would point out that a larger electric cable already feeds power in to Long Island coming all the way from New Jersey.  This dates back to 2007!  Like a giant extension cord, this transmission cable, named Neptune, stretches 50 miles underwater from Sayreville, N.J., comes ashore at Jones beach and has been plugged into Long Island for all these years without any nefarious effects on, or off shore. It is a 10″ cable and provides 660 megawatts.  

Likewise LIPA imports power from New England on the 330-megawatt Cross Sound Cable, which runs underwater from Connecticut. Two older cables, the 600-megawatt Y49 cable and the 599-megawatt Y50 cable, also run under the Sound to the Island.

Initial concerns about the effects on the shell fish industry were apparently not a problem over all these years.

Read more here:

Offshore wind project in jeopardy?

Submit a Comment to Show Your Support for the South Fork Wind Farm!

Take action!

As the per the Sierra Club, the first offshore wind project in New York is in jeopardy — act today to make sure we build the clean renewable, energy we need to meet New York’s bold climate commitments. 
 

New York has made bold climate commitments to power our state with 100% clean, renewable energy by 2040. The South Fork Wind Farm is a critical clean, renewable energy project that will help us meet this goal, but a few vocal opponents are trying to slow down renewable energy and climate progress.

You can play a role. The Public Service Commission (PSC) is collecting public comments. Let Governor Cuomo and the PSC know we must get this first offshore wind project built to lay the groundwork for future wind projects and to meet our bold climate and clean energy goals.

Public Comment on Deepwater Wind South Fork

www.southforkwindfarm.com.

STATE OF NEW YORK PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION
CASE 18-T-0604 -Application of Deepwater Wind South Fork, LLC for a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need for the Construction of Approximately 3.5 Miles of Submarine Export Cable from the New York State Territorial Waters Boundary to the South Shore of the Town of East Hampton in Suffolk County and Approximately 4.1 Miles of Terrestrial Export Cable from the South Shore of the Town of East Hampton to an Interconnection Facility with an Interconnection Cable Connecting to the Existing East Hampton Substation in the Town of East Hampton, Suffolk County.

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that public comment is sought on a request by Deepwater Wind South Fork, LLC, (Deepwater) for authorization to build and operate an electric transmission line. If granted, Deepwater would be authorized to build an approximately 3.5 mile submarine export cable from the New York State Territorial Waters boundary to the South Shore of the Town of East Hampton in Suffolk County and approximately 4.1 miles of 138 kV terrestrial export cable from the South Shore of the Town of East Hampton to an interconnection facility with an interconnection cable to an existing East Hampton Substation (the Project). The Project would connect the proposed South Fork Wind Farm, located in federal jurisdictional waters on the Outer Continental Shelf, to the existing mainland electric grid in the Town of Easthampton.

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that opportunities for public information and comment regarding Deepwater’s request will be provided as follows:

Date: June 11, 2019
Location: East Hampton Firehouse
1 Cedar St
East Hampton, NY 11937
Afternoon: Information Forum – 2:00 PM
Public Statement Hearing – 3:00 PM
Evening: Information Forum – 6:00 p.m.
Public Statement Hearing – 7:00 p.m.

During the scheduled informational forums, maps of the proposed route will be available to review, New York State Department of Public Service Staff representatives will give a short presentation on the review process in this case, and Deepwater representatives will be available to answer questions about its proposal. The public is welcome to stop in at any time during the informal informational forums to review information and ask questions.

Each informational forum will be followed by a public statement hearing where all those wishing to comment on Deepwater’s request will have an opportunity to make a statement on the record before an Administrative Law Judge. It is not necessary to make an appointment in advance, or present written material to speak at the hearing. Persons will be called to speak after completing a request card. Each public statement hearing will be held open for at least one-half hour and, where practicable, will be kept open until everyone wishing to speak has been heard or other reasonable arrangements have been made. A verbatim transcript of each hearing will be made for inclusion in the record of this proceeding.

Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations should call the Department of Public Service’s Human Resources Management Office at (518) 474-2520 as soon as possible. TDD users may request a sign language interpreter by placing a call through the New York Relay Service at 711. Individuals with difficulty understanding or reading English are encouraged to call the Commission at 1-800-342-3377 for free language assistance services regarding this notice.


Other Ways to Comment 
For those who cannot attend or prefer not to speak at a public statement hearing, there are several other ways to comment about this case to the Commission. Comments should refer to “Case 18-T-0604 – Deepwater.”

Internet or Mail: Go to www.dps.ny.gov, click on “Search,” search using case number “18-T-0604” and then click the “Post Comments” button at the top of the page; or send comments to the Secretary for the Commission atsecretary@dps.ny.gov. Alternatively, comments may be mailed or delivered to Hon. Kathleen H. Burgess, Secretary, Public Service Commission, Three Empire State Plaza, Albany, New York 12223-1350.

Toll-Free Opinion Line: You may call the Commission’s Opinion Line at 1-800-335-2120. This number is set up to take comments about pending cases from in-state callers, 24 hours a day. These comments are not transcribed verbatim, but a summary is provided to the Commission.

Although comments submitted via these alternate means will be accepted throughout the pendency of this proceeding, they are requested by July 12, 2019. Written comments received by the Department will become part of the record considered by the Commission. Written comments may be viewed online (go to www.dps.ny.gov, click on “Search,” search using the case number and then click on the “Public Comments” tab). Many libraries offer free Internet access. The application may be viewed at www.dps.ny.gov  (search using the case number) or at the East Hampton Library (East Hampton), the Hampton Library Central Library (Bridgehampton), the Amagansett Free Library Central Library (Amagansett) or the Springs Library (East Hampton).

(SIGNED)                

KATHLEEN H. BURGESS
Secretary